State Laws

State Labor Laws

Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
DC
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

There are just over 300,000,000 million folks living in 50 states across America. If the unemployment rate is hovering around 9% and you factor in minors, you're still dealing with well over 200,000,000 people who are working in some kind of job. Other then the self-employed, most of these working folks have labor laws that directly impact their employment. You might not be aware of all the specific codes and regulations that pertain to your job, but it is the responsibility of every legislature to develop their own state's labor laws.

Every job site is required by law to post labor laws. After that it becomes the responsibility of the worker to read and understand which laws apply to them. The following links provide a quick snapshot of all of the state labor laws. Is your site up to code? Is your boss breaking the law? Find out now.

Wages and Overtime Labor Laws
When you are hired for a job, you should be abundantly clear of what is expected of you. Obviously that includes your salary. If you are hired at an hourly rate for particular amount of time each day then going over that amount constitutes overtime. What are you entitled to with regard to overtime pay? What is the minimum wage for an hour's work in your state? If you are working part time are you still entitled to overtime pay? It is better if you know the wage and overtime laws before accepting a job and especially before getting your first paycheck.

Maternity Leave Labor Laws
It's a sad state of affairs that the government had to step in to regulate maternity leave laws. These laws were established to secure your job while providing a specific amount of time allowing you to take care of the newest member of the family. Did you know these laws extend to both moms and dads? They also can apply to newly adopted children or children who are coming to live with you in a resolution of a child custody case.

Your employee could offer extended maternity leave benefits, but there is a specific minimum amount of time you are allowed to take with the guarantee that your job will be waiting for you when you return. That will definitely take some of the pressure off of having a baby!

Minor Labor Laws
There was a time in our nation's history when children as young as 10 years old were hired to work in deplorable conditions. Fortunately, those days are long gone for Americans. However, that doesn't mean a young person can't get a job. The cutoff for child working is 12 years old. However, there are exemptions for work on the family farm. But even mom and dad have to be aware of the various child labor laws when it comes to the amount of work and time of day a child can be employed.

There are some states that require work permits for minors under the age of 18. Most states also have restrictions with regard to different environments that minors can be employed in. For instance, most minors are restricted from working at any job where selling liquor is the primary function of the business.